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. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
tear gassed protesters in cairo's tahrir square. angry demonstrators packed the square today denouncing egyptian president mohamed morsi as a dictator and accusing him of a power grab. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo. reza, what's it look like now? >> reporter: joe, it is 11:00 p.m. cairo time. these demonstrators started gathering around in tahrir square about 1:00 p.m. local time. that means they've been going strong for about ten hours. many thought maybe egyptians were worn out, tired of demonstrating after the 2011 revolution, but if you look at tahrir square today, if you look at cairo today, it doesn't seem like it. the demonstrations are continuing. so are clashes. about an hour and a half ago clashes taking place right where we are behind us at the hotel we're staying at. security forces clashing with protesters. a number of protesters ambushed a police vehicle carrying riot police. the police took off. the protesters got ahold of this truck, set it on fire. more security forces came in, shot tear gas and disbursed the protesters. we've seen similar clashes throughout the day. all
square in cairo after the new egyptian president morsi gave himself sweeping new powers today. tahrir square also the heart of last year's uprising. demonstrators filled the streets of alexandria later today. morsi's new powers put his own decisions above all legal challenges until a new egyptian parliament is elected. despite the protests, morsi moving ahead with his plans at the same time insisting that his new powers are for the good ofu issued a statement moments ago saying in part, quote, we call for calm and encourage all parties to work together and call for all egyptians to resolve their differences over these important issues peacefully and through democratic dialogue. jim maceda will join us coming up in 20 minutes right here. >>> turning from egypt now to the border between israel and gaza where a two-day cease fire is already being tested. israeli troops shot and killed a 20-year-old man on the gaza side of the line today. the first death since the truce. nbc news reporting that the man was trying to get to his family farm. we have coverage from both sides of the border to
hillary clinton is in cairo this morning working to make that peace happen. can egypt help bring an end to the fighting? and back at home, all eyes on the white house for a thanksgiving tradition. the presidential turkey pardon. get ready to gobble up the history of this bird watch. good morning from washington. it's wednesday, november 21st, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert filling in for the great chuck todd. a commuter bus exploded in central tel aviv injuring at least 19 people steps away from the national defense he headquarters. israeli police confirm that an explosive device detonated but say it was not a suicide attack. the white house is calling the attack against israeli civilians outrage o outrageous. the united kingdom is condemning the, quote, shocking violence. the eight-day conflict between israel and hamas has claimed the lives of more than 130 palestinians and five israelis. despite hopes of a ceasefire, tuesday ended as the conflict's deadliest day. secretary clinton who rushed to the region to try to prevent an escalation of the conflict is in cairo
with its own people. [chanting] just ahead protests in the streets of cairo and why the egyptian president ♪ backing down. what of the israeli truce? plus the u.s. ambassador to the united nations susan rice took some heat over her comments on the libya consulate attack. now it looks like though her critics have some ammunition against their claims. now she is going to go speak to some of them on capitol hill. benghazi and susan rice and is the tide turning? that's coming up from the journalists of fox news on this monday fox report. a hybrid? most are just no fun to drive. now, here's one that will make you feel alive. meet the five-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max says ha. c-max says wheeee. which is what you get, don't you see? cause c-max has lots more horsepower than prius v, a hybrid that c-max also bests in mpg. say hi to the all-new 47 combined mpg c-max hybrid. olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great
of protests against his actions. on tuesday, at least 200,000 people filled cairo's tahrir square, accusing morsi and his muslim brotherhood of hijacking last year's revolution. liberal and secular groups also condemned a move to fast-track a final vote on a new constitution. >> ( translated ): we want a constitution that represents all egyptian people, not one that represent a certain faction of egyptians. >> ( translated ): the constitutional panel tasked to >> brown: the constitution is being drafted by an assembly dominated by islamists. that body moved up the vote to this week, because the country's supreme constitutional court is expected to issue a ruling on sunday that could dissolve the assembly. in washington today, state department spokesperson victoria nuland also raised concerns about the new constitution. >> we've been very clear all we want to see this constitution meet international human rights standards, protections for all groups in egypt and to have a judicial set of guarantees that also meets international judicial standards. but again we haven't seen the specific draft
of the united states. >>> tens of thousands of protesters crowd the streets of cairo after president morsi draft as new constitution overnight. we'll get a live report and what's next for ambassador susan rice after her week of meetings on capitol hill to try to end the back and forth over benghazi? we'll get the political postscript with mark murray. be sure to check out the news nation tumbler page. you'll find lots of behind the scenes -- there's one right there. it's news nation.tumbler.com. wasn't my daughter's black bean soup spectacular? [ man thinking ] oh, this gas. those antacids aren't working. oh no, not that, not here! [ male announcer ] antacids don't relieve gas. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. gas-x. the gas xperts. gas-x is designed to relieve gas. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more
. >>> egypt is poised for more demonstrations in cairo tomorrow over a new constitutional crisis. president muhammed morsi's challenge to the judiciary involving holdovers from the mubarak regime and raulong traditions. joining me is ambassador dennis ross. thank you so much. good to see you. >> you too. >> egypt. now, perhaps morsi felt empowered by his role as a peacemaker on gaza, but he ran right into long-standing traditions. >> he did. he did. i think bear in mind a couple of things. number one, he felt that the role he played made him a central figure in the region as a whole. in mubarak's last few years, the fact was mubarak was increasingly on the sidelines, not playing a major role in the middle east. here's president morsi thinking he can play on the image they are a leader in the region and he can use that as a device to make a move internally. he made that move but i think it's a clear miscalculation because he took on the independents of the judiciary. it doesn't matter that. these were leaders who were holdovers from the mubarak regime, they still represented a symbol of inde
, and she'll meet with leaders in cairo next. now, the other deal, the president and congressional leaders are working on, no progress on the fiscal cliff either. congressional leaders are taking a holiday breaks from the talks, but staff members have not been encouraged by their early huddles. let me bring in politico's deputy white house editor and joanne green, managing editor of the brie owe and msnbc contributor. good morning. >> good morning. >> we'll get to the situation in the middle east in just a minute. i want to start with the fiscal cliff and politico's front page today. "rough start for fiscal cliff talks." looked like everything was going really well after that first meeting. now that the dealing is really getting under way, the sources tell politico neither side seems actually all that serious. what's going on here? >> our reporting shows that despite the politics of the seeming to suggest that a deal should be struck and despite the meeting that happened with the congressional leaders at the white house last week that had everybody walk out of it and use the word construct
of the egyptian in cairo, there were protests about this anti-muslim film. the republicans have pounced on that. you heard john mccain and lindsey graham saying there is no way they want her to be secretary of state, nominated to secretary of state. everybody knew that it was terrorism. >> everybody knew it was terrorism. well, today, one of the things that david petraeus said is that he knew right away it was terrorism. and in the talking points, they took that out because it was classified and they talked about extremists. now susan rice says this began as a spontaneous, not premeditated response to what happened in cairo. i don't think her language was very careful. that's why they pounced on that language. i think things were slightly settled down today because you heard from dave petraeus because he said she was giving these talking points. i don't think it's settled down completely. i think you'll probably still see john mccain and lindsey graham. >> do you think she'll be secretary of state? >> i don't know. i don't know whether she'll be nominated. that is one of the things that preside
it was a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and she never described it as a terror attack back then and that has outrained key republicans who find her comments very troubling. >> i don't think this is a matter of dishonesty. it was a matter again of responsibility. there was plenty of information out there which she has access to, which contradicted what she said. well you have, if you're telling the american people speaking for the white house, it was the white house that sent her out, you have the responsibility to make sure those facts are accurate. >> reporter: so they're looking at responsibility component of this, not so much dishonesty, there were allegations perhaps she was trying to help the white house cover up something. now it is going to the core what she knew and was she fundamentally wrong and came out and said spontaneous reaction as opposed to describing as a terror attack. ambassador rice will be meeting a few minutes from now to answer the questions from senator mccain and others who have problem with her statements
. >> i'm zoraida sambolin. >> in egypt the u.s. embassy in cairo is closed. no one is being allowed in or out of the embassy now. embassy officials say the entrance is blocked by protesters as clashes erupt nearby. massive demonstrations against president morsy threatened the new young government after a degree last week extending his powers to an e uneasy level for some egyptians. americans in cairo going to the embassy for business, please don't. no one is going in or out of the embassy in cairo. >> and finding a way to steer clear of the fiscal cliff. the chief fiscal cliff negotiator tim geithner working with leaders to get things moving. there are just 33 days left to get a deal done. congress breaks for the holidays in just 15 days. dan lothian joins us. so the clock is ticking away. >> after the meeting the president had after he went to southeast asia the lawmakers were optimistic. now you are hearing some pessimistic as the clock winds down. you see the president pushing the bush era tax cut extension for middle class america. the white house doesn't believe this is the com
onto the streets. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo with the latest. hi, steve. >> reporter: gregg, behind me we're seeing the start of violence at this major demonstration in cairo. you see crowds off to my right, the tens of thousands who have gathered here beginning to run. we've seen tear gas fired as well as molotov cocktails. this big crowd here today, the biggest we've seen in some time, is really in reaction to what the new egyptian president did yesterday, muhammad morsi issuing some stunning information, first, that any decree he issues will be legal and that any declaration he issues is final and cannot be appealed by anyone, including the courts. the new egyptian president has basically, on paper, put himself above the law here saying the courts have no say, and obviously, there's a lot of people -- tens of thousands of egyptians -- who are not happy with it. morsi supporters say this was a necessary move to try to get rid of holdovers from the old regime of hosni mubarak. they say it's only temporary until they get a new constitution. but opponents are furious a
you overseas where the u.s. embassy in cairo is shutting its doors to the public today as police clash with demonstrators in a new round of violent protests in tahrir square. all this comes as we wait to hear from president morsi who's expected to appear on egyptian television, and it could be his appearance as soon as this hour. steve harrigan's in cairo with more. steve? >> reporter: jenna, the protesters are out behind me for the or seventh night in a row, and as you mentioned, part of the u.s. embassy -- the part that deals with the public and visitor -- was shut down today not because the embassy was targeted, but really because of fears of peripheral violence. this whole section of downtown cairo has seen large street protests for the last several days, police and protesters exchanging rocks and tear gas. two buildings on this street were set on fire overnight. those blazes are now out. we are expecting to see egypt's president in a taped television address later today. he'll likely be introducing a new constitution that's being voted on by the assembly now. that constitution can
>> good morning, everyone, it's sunday, november 25th, i'm alisyn camerota. in cairo muslim brotherhood encourages protests. anti-morsi protesters taking over tahrir square. >> dave: and shredder, and police files used as confetti at the macy's day parade. how can it happen? is our security now at risk? >> illinois has the worst budget deficit in the nation and why is the state spending millions of taxpayer dollars on table for prisoners. >> and eco friendly zip lines, maybe they want them to watch "fox & friends" in prison, have you ever thought of that. >> dave: amen, there's some viewers, baby. >> clayton: "fox & friends" begins right now. ♪ . >> alisyn:. >> alisyn: good morning, everybody, thanks for joining us bright and early on this sunday morning, we have quite a show for you, including the ongoing debate that dave briggs launched yesterday about yoga pants and we invite you to weigh in this morning. >> clayton: you're still leading this fight and championing this fight. >> alisyn: he's made it a platform. >> dave: i may run for the white house based on yoga pants.
streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt. what happens if they fail to reach any kind of compromise here? >> reporter: well for the past four days we've already seen violence in the streets not only here in cairo but other egyptian cities as well. more than 500 people wounded, one person killed. if there is no compromise today, we could see million man marches on both sides of the issue tomorrow in cairo. when you have a million people on one side, a mil
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. hamas was going to remain defiant in the face of israel's aggression on its people. alex? >> okay. thank you very much for the latest from gaza. we go from there to israel. nbc's martin fletcher is standing by in te
to address the nation. before that atresz, more violence today in the streets of cairo. protesters demanding president morsi rescind his decree once again clashing with police. there are calms for giant protests coming up for tomorrow as well as saturday. nbc news chief foreign correspondent richard engel joins us live from cairo with more on this. president morsi, richard, is expected to address the nation at the top of the hour. do we have any information about what he's going to say basically trying to calm the crowds that are expected to protest? >> reporter: yeah. i think what he's going to say, however, is not going to calm these crowds. it is only going to make them more angry. he's probably going to set a date for a referendum on the constitution. as you said, a week ago today, president morsi gave himself extraordinary powers. he made himself more powerful than any previous egyptian presidents. more powerful than the kings of egypt, in fact. he said that his word was law. that in decree that he issued could not be overturned by the supreme court, by any court in this land. his word
cairo with steve hariggan, standing by live. >> reporter: the numbers are building of protesters here in tahrir square, the number of tents growing as the protesters say they are here to stay and digging in. on the street below me, over the past few minutes, we have seen young protesters, lighting bottles on fire and running. the skirmishes have wounded more than 3 people. we have seen the military begin to move large concrete block, blocking off certain narrow alleyways and protecting government buildings. explosions can be heard behind me. right now, one key thing to watch is where the protests go next. we are expecting major demonstrations on both sides on tth. those who support president morsi and think he is doing what needs to be done. and those who think he is making a power grab, trying to become a dictator. both groups will try to get out their constituents on tuesday. it will be a real test of power. the final thing to watch, the country's judges, many are saying they are going on strike. it could shut down the judicial system across the country this week. >> shannon: steve,
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
of the u.s. embassy in cairo is now closed. this after violent clashes cutting off access to the u.s. embassy in cairo. there are thousands back in the street and they are angry, demanding president mohammed morsi, the new president step down. steve harrigan streams live in cairo, it is nightfall now. what do we know about the u.s. embassy, steve? >> the u.s. embassy building is really just down the block from where i'm standing here and egypt security forces have put up a 12-foot high call of cinder block to keep that alleyway safe where the embassy is. the public services section which visitors use is closed today. that part of it is closed off. the embassy itself has not been targeted but it is part of a rough taeub rough neighborhood around tahrir square where protestors are throwing rocks and police are firing teargas. two buildings were set on fire, those blazes are now out. warnings issued to all americans to avoid the downtown area over the next few days due to the unrest, bill. bill: when will the new egyptian president morsi speak, do we know that, steve? >> reporter: we
's call of duty, heading up to capitol hill to broker a debt deal. dagen: u.s. embassy closed in cairo amid protests, of bid muhamed morsi's power grab. connell: can you hear me now syndrome, wireless carriers are ranked on their performance. we will have the worst and the best. dagen: stocks now lend every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at stock exchange with economic news this morning. is that what is giving the market a lift? nicole: we have a lot going on here. we have jobless claims for the second week, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasu
option would be a ground invasion, tamron. >> martin, thank you very much. in cairo today thousands gather to protest the gaza air strikes demanding that the egyptian government cut ties with israel. that's a development in the region. let's bring in "time" magazine international editor jim frederick. you heard the reports with me. martin fletcher indicating that perhaps not even net uh-hy neta anyone knows what the next phase will be? >> the next 48 hours are critical because the deputy foreign minister basically threatened hamas. you might have a ground offensive. the very important thing to keep our eye on over the next 48 hours is that yippian president morsi is meeting with the prime minister from turkey. they're meeting in cairo. these are two crucial countries. on one hand you have -- they're both large populations. historic allally they're wester friendly. they're anchors between israel and their neighbors. he's probably the most distinguished and elder statementsmen in the region, and morsi is new and democratically elected and trying to make his mark as a statesman himself
grab by egypt's president has thousands of people protesting in the streets of cairo. latest on what is happening in egypt after the break. >> it is easy to be a liberal when you have a million dollars in the bank. he doesn't need a union for rich people. if he feels that way and warren buffett and these guys feel that way get your checkbook and show us what occurs. stuart: to fire about patriotic millionaires, a lot of people fired about the facebook page. we told you we were going into triple digits. the dow is up 100 points and there is light volume today. big money people can move the market and apparently, let's go to robert gray. robert: the tech outpacing the broader market. tech stocks in the s&p down leading the charge and it is down below $9 with a disappointing earnings just a week ago and certainly ramping into the black holiday and shopping for electronic gadgets. michael dell said the windows 8 launch last month, giving consumers a real reason to upgrade in several years. the touch screen technology, convertible and hybrid, basically tablets', laptops at the same time t
for himself a new dictatorship. reza sayah is in cairo right now. do these protesters have a point? is this the same style of leadership that triggered the arab spring? >> if you ask the protesters if they have a point, they'll give you an emphatic yes. these are demonstrators who believe the revolution, the principles of the 2011 revolution is in jeopardy, and they believe its current president mohammed morsi who has put those principles in jeopardy. all this outrage and fury as the outcome of a set of decrees suddenly announced on thursday night. these give them sweeping powers and it seems to be an effort to push through the drafting of egypt's all new constitution. one of the decrees says that no one, not even the judiciary can overturn and appeal any of mr. morsi's declarations, decisions since he took office in june. this order seems to be put in place until a parliament is in place. several months from now. technically this is a man who can do whatever he wants for the next few months without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, fredricka, that people here are outraged
this thing will last. gregg: did secretary clinton's shuttle diplomacy from jerusalem to cairo prove pen official here? >> -- beneficial here in. >> yes, certainly. the administration deserves credit, to be sure, but it's not a major victory in the sense that we have a middle east peace which has been as elusive to this administration as it has been to the previous ones. but at the end of her reign as secretary of state, her tenure is coming to conclusion with mounting criticism over benghazi and the lack of security, this certainly is a plus. gregg: are you surprised at how helpful the new islamist government of muhammad morsi really was in this process as a mediator standing up for the truce, probably pressuring hamas and, of course, their benefactor? are you surprised at what they did? yeah. i think it's a pleasant surprise. i mean, this is not the government we would have wanted in egypt post-mubarak because they are muslim brotherhood, and there's parts of the muslim brotherhood that is totally alien to us, the salafist movement which are radical islamists, but here he is openly spo
the new pharoah. we'll go live to cairo. heather: and expectant parents given the worst news possible about their baby, but what happens next can best be described as a thanksgiving prayer come true. stay tuned for this. >> they told me that he was alive, so it was wonderful, you know? everybody's happy, everybody's crying now because it was life. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine
in cairo and the video as opposed to, no, this was a terrorist attack. my take away was that, you know, their initial reaction was it was a response to what was going on in cairo but there may have been also other elements of terrorism there and from there it went to secretary rice who seemed to focus just on the video rather than saying it was a lot of different things. so i'm kind of in the middle on this in my dissection. i do think petraeus did say that there's a lot of things that play here but once he released that to the administration, they chose to focus primarily on the video and not so much on the other elements. i really don't know why they did that. it doesn't really make sense to me. but that's pretty much how today went. >> sir, if senator john mccain has called for a watergate style investigation into the attack, basically asking for a select committee coming out earlier this week with senators to say they aren't going to get enough information through what we're seeing in the testimony of petraeus and thinks there is an under current here of something else. do you agre
to the peace negotiations going on, inside of cairo, to either have a cease-fire treaty signed sometime in the next 24 hours or there will be tanks rolling across these fields, into gaza. chris, back to you. >> chris: leland vittert reporting live from the israel-gaza border. thanks for that. joining us now, two leading senators on national security issues. saxby chambliss, vice chair of the intelligence committee an joe lieberman, head of the homeland security committee. senators, before we get to the benghazi investigation i want to ask you both about the growing conflict between israel and the palestinians in gaza. senator lieberman, while israel clearly has to be able to defend itself, do you worry about a ground war in gaza, especially, in the changing post-arab spring middle east? >> well, obviously it is in the first instance to hamas, i don't think the israelis really want a ground war. they'll go into gaza if they feel they need to, to eliminate the remainder of the missiles, and a lot of which are supplied to hamas by iran, that have been coming over to israel, hundreds of the
the mobilization of 75,000 army reservists. joining us now is nbc live from gaza. as peace talks continue in cairo, israel is demanding that hamas stop firing rockets across the border. is there a willingness to do this or has the number of civilian casualties made a cease-fire now much less likely? >> well, you know, the fact that the negotiations are ongoing is an indication that palestinian factions can abide by the truce. in fact, in the past it's been on multiple occasions documented that palestinian factions have been committed to the truce until there's been some kind of violation, if you will, from the israeli side that israel justifies as an act in its own security. nonetheless, palestinian factions say they have abided by it in the past, they would abide by it again in the future if there is one in place. the question is can they get to that agreement in the next couple hours before time runs out. and the question really surrounding the truce have to deal with the cessation of hostilities. israel wants an immediate cessation of hostilities. then enter into negotiations about lifting a fi
in egypt, still at the funeral and with family. he was not expected to be back in cairo to make an announcem t announcement. it was something that would probably come out of the egyptian intelligence service which has been negotiating intensity. egypt's president mohamed morsi is from the muslim brother hood. it's unlike he he has been involved in negotiations with the israeli side. the only people that could negotiate between the israelis and meet with hamas and other palestinian factions are probably the intelligence agencies there. that's where we understand the negotiations to still be ongoing. there's an outlined agreement, but nobody has signed the paper. that's why i think people here are still very apprehensive this could be the final hurdle. you're talking about the presence or the arrival of u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton. there is no doubt the u.s. can play a very important role in this. it can exert a tremendous amount of leverage on the israelis to avoid a ground invasion of the gaza strip. while the u.s. does believe that israel has a right too defend its
in the last couple of years. he has not achieved the breakthroughs that he wanted when he went to cairo in 2009. and while many on his team have abandoned the playing field, mitchell, dennis ross, this is a unique opportunity for him to reinvigorate his middle east leadership and bring a new team in with new ideas and strategies to resurrect the commitments he made in cairo which is essential to u.s. long-term interest. >> the other relationship is the one between the president and prime minister -- mr. netanyahu, who actually praised the president's diplomatic efforts within this. he's got an election coming up. it's been something of a rocky relationship, if you will. how does this -- the president's involvement strengthen his relationship with netanyahu going forward? >> there's been all this criticism of this relationship, the dysfunctionalty over political issues, negotiations. one thing that's quite clear to me in watching the president very carefully, after the election, he didn't need the jewish vote in florida or new york, and yet he stood up to the plate, he had his reels back
to broker the cease. jim is joining us from cairo. this was seen as a test of the relations following the arab spring, so how did it do? >> reporter: morsi has passed the test as ayman and martin suggested, this is the middle east and there's not a lot of optimism. we'll see how morsi chooses. there may be a moment of truth where he has to decide between hamas or with the truce. we don't know how he'll do that or which way he'll go, but so far it's pretty amazing to see this man who was not even a muslim brotherhood's main candidate for president. he was the backup plan now receiving the praises of everyone yesterday from hamas to benjamin netanyahu, clinton, president obama, everyone had good things to say about morsi who is emerging as a pragmatic guy and politician but as a regional star. hillary clinton spent hours with morsi and his foreign minister talking about stopping the hostilities and negotiating everything else later. this time with morsi as the mediator, today in "the new york times" you can actually see the turnaround in president obama's thinking about morsi. it starte
is live for us in cairo. jim, good day to you there in cairo. what's going on this morning? >> hi there, alex. it's kind of a festive atmosphere down below me there on tahrir square. several hundred people chanting, marching, but the flag -- the tents are out. some of the stands are out. the tea man is out. it's a bit reminiscent of how it was almost now two years ago. and egyptians, you know, seem more divided than ever, alex. for many here their elected leaders -- or i should say the elected leader morsi himself has just driven a wedge deeper and even wider. at dawn there were more tents than protesters on tahrir square. ground zero for last year's uprising. but that didn't stop clashes with police on approach roads where protesters blocked traffic, defying president mohamed morsi's orders. after morsi declared sweeping powers for himself, leaving him above the law. "we are here because the goals of the revolution have yet to be achieved" said this protester. morsi told the supporters he had to take radical measures to protect the revolution. and fast-track a new constitution being wr
organization is celebrating all of this success and now hillary clinton is heading to cairo, this is a celebration for the bad guys. >> what is secretary clinton going to do? the bad guys are proclaiming victory here. those are bad guys. i don't see how in the world this can play out favorably for israel. i would have liked secretary clinton to have said those words two or three years ago. this has been a low grade constant conflict since the 2008 invasion that did not take out hamas. this is going to be a major boom for the arab contractors. and of course, hamas is going to replentish more weapons and get more money from countries like katar that put down $450 million from the privilege from the visit what is that all about. i would like mrs. clinton to go to katar and ask them what did they get for their $450 million payment. >> we talked about this on your radio show years ago. i think we both thought it was a terrible idea at the time. was do you make of it now, john? why did they give up the strip? they are going to have aggravation until the end of time with this? >> i
with egyptian negotiators in cairo. hamas is saying that israel can stop the fighting simply by agreeing to hamas' demands. they're claiming israel is begging for a truce. a claim that israel vehemently denies. in other lighter news this morning, let's turn back to u.s. political news where representative alan west is still buried in denial. he won his bid for a recount of early ballots in st. lucie county but he is still losing when it comes to keeping his congressional seat in florida's district 18. in fact, democratic patrick murphy picked up some 300 more votes over the weekend bringing his total to about 2,000. west is still refusing to concede the election saying that he plans to review the result and additional data in order to decide how to move forward. murphy has claimed victory and it is very clear that west is probably all done. we're back with more steph after the break. these talking points, that the right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? yo
because morsi hails from the brotherhood, a political cousin to hamas. we are joined from cairo. how are egyptians feeling about this cease-fire this morning? >> reporter: well, if you're the leadership of the muslim brotherhood in cairo you're patting yourself on the back today because they really came out looking very favorably in the international community throughout this process. this is a big test for egypt's government led now but the muslim brotherhood. a talk show host had a lot of concern. would this be a movement that would take up arms? would this be a movement that would give material support for hamas. it turns out that those fears, the way things stand right now turned out to be groundless. it looks like this is a government that's approached this very even handedly to keep their peace treaty and their economic alliances with washington and western capitals. in the end it doesn't look like this is a government that wanted to be seen as radical in the community. >>> back at home u.s. ambassador susan rice is speaking out about those talking points that she delivered on
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